FreeIPA Lightweight CA internals

In the preceding post, I explained the use cases for the FreeIPA lightweight sub-CAs feature, how to manage CAs and use them to issue certificates, and current limitations. In this post I detail some of the internals of how the feature works, including how signing keys are distributed to replicas, and how sub-CA certificate renewal works. I conclude with a brief retrospective on delivering the feature.

Full details of the design of the feature can be found on the design page. This post does not cover everything from the design page, but we will look at the aspects that are covered from the perspective of the system administrator, i.e. "what is happening on my systems?"

Dogtag lightweight CA creation

The PKI system used by FreeIPA is called Dogtag. It is a separate project with its own interfaces; most FreeIPA certificate management features are simply reflecting a subset of the corresponding Dogtag interface, often integrating some additional access controls or identity management concepts. This is certainly the case for FreeIPA sub-CAs. The Dogtag lightweight CAs feature was implemented initially to support the FreeIPA use case, yet not all aspects of the Dogtag feature are used in FreeIPA as of v4.4, and other consumers of the Dogtag feature are likely to emerge (in particular: OpenStack).

The Dogtag lightweight CAs feature has its own design page which documents the feature in detail, but it is worth mentioning some important aspects of the Dogtag feature and their impact on how FreeIPA uses the feature.

  • Dogtag lightweight CAs are managed via a REST API. The FreeIPA framework uses this API to create and manage lightweight CAs, using the privileged RA Agent certificate to authenticate. In a future release we hope to remove the RA Agent and authenticate as the FreeIPA user using GSS-API proxy credentials.
  • Each CA in a Dogtag instance, including the "main" CA, has an LDAP entry with object class authority. The schema includes fields such as subject and issuer DN, certificate serial number, and a UUID primary key, which is randomly generated for each CA. When FreeIPA creates a CA, it stores this UUID so that it can map the FreeIPA CA’s common name (CN) to the Dogtag authority ID in certificate requests or other management operations (e.g. CA deletion).
  • The "nickname" of the lightweight CA signing key and certificate in Dogtag’s NSSDB is the nickname of the "main" CA signing key, with the lightweight CA’s UUID appended. In general operation FreeIPA does not need to know this, but the ipa-certupdate program has been enhanced to set up Certmonger tracking requests for FreeIPA-managed lightweight CAs and therefore it needs to know the nicknames.
  • Dogtag lightweight CAs may be nested, but FreeIPA as of v4.4 does not make use of this capability.

So, let’s see what actually happens on a FreeIPA server when we add a lightweight CA. We will use the sc example from the previous post. The command executed to add the CA, with its output, was:

% ipa ca-add sc --subject "CN=Smart Card CA, O=IPA.LOCAL" \
    --desc "Smart Card CA"
---------------
Created CA "sc"
---------------
  Name: sc
  Description: Smart Card CA
  Authority ID: 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
  Subject DN: CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL
  Issuer DN: CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330

The LDAP entry added to the Dogtag database was:

dn: cn=660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd,ou=authorities,ou=ca,o=ipaca
authoritySerial: 63
objectClass: authority
objectClass: top
cn: 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
authorityID: 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
authorityKeyNickname: caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d87
 4c84fd
authorityKeyHost: f24b-0.ipa.local:443
authorityEnabled: TRUE
authorityDN: CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL
authorityParentDN: CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
authorityParentID: d3e62e89-df27-4a89-bce4-e721042be730

We see the authority UUID in the authorityID attribute as well as cn and the DN. authorityKeyNickname records the nickname of the signing key in Dogtag’s NSSDB. authorityKeyHost records which hosts possess the signing key – currently just the host on which the CA was created. authoritySerial records the serial number of the certificate (more that that later). The meaning of the rest of the fields should be clear.

If we have a peek into Dogtag’s NSSDB, we can see the new CA’s certificate:

# certutil -d /etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias -L

Certificate Nickname              Trust Attributes
                                  SSL,S/MIME,JAR/XPI

caSigningCert cert-pki-ca         CTu,Cu,Cu
auditSigningCert cert-pki-ca      u,u,Pu
Server-Cert cert-pki-ca           u,u,u
caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd u,u,u
ocspSigningCert cert-pki-ca       u,u,u
subsystemCert cert-pki-ca         u,u,u

There it is, alongside the main CA signing certificate and other certificates used by Dogtag. The trust flags u,u,u indicate that the private key is also present in the NSSDB. If we pretty print the certificate we will see a few interesting things:

# certutil -d /etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias -L \
    -n 'caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd'
Certificate:
    Data:
        Version: 3 (0x2)
        Serial Number: 63 (0x3f)
        Signature Algorithm: PKCS #1 SHA-256 With RSA Encryption
        Issuer: "CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330"
        Validity:
            Not Before: Fri Jul 15 05:46:00 2016
            Not After : Tue Jul 15 05:46:00 2036
        Subject: "CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL"
        ...
        Signed Extensions:
            ...
            Name: Certificate Basic Constraints
            Critical: True
            Data: Is a CA with no maximum path length.
            ...

Observe that:

  • The certificate is indeed a CA.
  • The serial number (63) agrees with the CA’s LDAP entry.
  • The validity period is 20 years, the default for CAs in Dogtag. This cannot be overridden on a per-CA basis right now, but addressing this is a priority.

Finally, let’s look at the raw entry for the CA in the FreeIPA database:

dn: cn=sc,cn=cas,cn=ca,dc=ipa,dc=local
cn: sc
ipaCaIssuerDN: CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
objectClass: ipaca
objectClass: top
ipaCaSubjectDN: CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL
ipaCaId: 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
description: Smart Card CA

We can see that this entry also contains the subject and issuer DNs, and the ipaCaId attribute holds the Dogtag authority ID, which allows the FreeIPA framework to dereference the local ID (sc) to the Dogtag ID as needed. We also see that the description attribute is local to FreeIPA; Dogtag also has a description attribute for lightweight CAs but FreeIPA uses its own.

Lightweight CA replication

FreeIPA servers replicate objects in the FreeIPA directory among themselves, as do Dogtag replicas (note: in Dogtag, the term clone is often used). All Dogtag instances in a replicated environment need to observe changes to lightweight CAs (creation, modification, deletion) that were performed on another replica and update their own view so that they can respond to requests consistently. This is accomplished via an LDAP persistent search which is run in a monitor thread. Care was needed to avoid race conditions. Fortunately, the solution for LDAP-based profile storage provided a fine starting point for the authority monitor; although lightweight CAs are more complex, many of the same race conditions can occur and these were already addressed in the LDAP profile monitor implementation.

But unlike LDAP-based profiles, a lightweight CA consists of more than just an LDAP object; there is also the signing key. The signing key lives in Dogtag’s NSSDB and for security reasons cannot be transported through LDAP. This means that when a Dogtag clone observes the addition of a lightweight CA, an out-of-band mechanism to transport the signing key must also be triggered.

This mechanism is covered in the design pages but the summarised process is:

  1. A Dogtag clone observes the creation of a CA on another server and starts a KeyRetriever thread. The KeyRetriever is implemented as part of Dogtag, but it is configured to run the /usr/libexec/ipa/ipa-pki-retrieve-key program, which is part of FreeIPA. The program is invoked with arguments of the server to request the key from (this was stored in the authorityKeyHost attribute mentioned earlier), and the nickname of the key to request.
  2. ipa-pki-retrieve-key requests the key from the Custodia daemon on the source server. It authenticates as the dogtag/<requestor-hostname>@REALM service principal. If authenticated and authorised, the Custodia daemon exports the signing key from Dogtag’s NSSDB wrapped by the main CA’s private key, and delivers it to the requesting server. ipa-pki-retrieve-key outputs the wrapped key then exits.
  3. The KeyRetriever reads the wrapped key and imports (unwraps) it into the Dogtag clone’s NSSDB. It then initialises the Dogtag CA’s Signing Unit allowing the CA to service signing requests on that clone, and adds its own hostname to the CA’s authorityKeyHost attribute.

Some excerpts of the CA debug log on the clone (not the server on which the sub-CA was first created) shows this process in action. The CA debug log is found at /var/log/pki/pki-tomcat/ca/debug. Some irrelevant messages have been omitted.

[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: Processed change controls.
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: ADD
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: new entryUSN = 109
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: CertificateAuthority init 
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: ca.signing Signing Unit nickname caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: SigningUnit init: debug Certificate object not found
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: CA signing key and cert not (yet) present in NSSDB
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][authorityMonitor]: Starting KeyRetrieverRunner thread

Above we see the authorityMonitor thread observe the addition of a CA. It adds the CA to its internal map and attempts to initialise it, which fails because the key and certificate are not available, so it starts a KeyRetrieverRunner in a new thread.

[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Running ExternalProcessKeyRetriever
[25/Jul/2016:15:45:56][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: About to execute command: [/usr/libexec/ipa/ipa-pki-retrieve-key, caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd, f24b-0.ipa.local]

The KeyRetrieverRunner thread invokes ipa-pki-retrieve-key with the nickname of the key it wants, and a host from which it can retrieve it. If a CA has multiple sources, the KeyRetrieverRunner will try these in order with multiple invocations of the helper, until one succeeds. If none succeed, the thread goes to sleep and retries when it wakes up initially after 10 seconds, then backing off exponentially.

[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Importing key and cert
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Reinitialising SigningUnit
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: ca.signing Signing Unit nickname caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Got token Internal Key Storage Token by name
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Found cert by nickname: 'caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd' with serial number: 63
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Got private key from cert
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Got public key from cert
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: in init - got CA name CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL

The key retriever successfully returned the key data and import succeeded. The signing unit then gets initialised.

[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: Adding self to authorityKeyHosts attribute
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: In LdapBoundConnFactory::getConn()
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: postCommit: new entryUSN = 361
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:13][KeyRetrieverRunner-660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd]: postCommit: nsUniqueId = 4dd42782-4a4f11e6-b003b01c-c8916432
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:14][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: Processed change controls.
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:14][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: MODIFY
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:14][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: new entryUSN = 361
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:14][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: known entryUSN = 361
[25/Jul/2016:15:47:14][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: data is current

Finally, the Dogtag clone adds itself to the CA’s authorityKeyHosts attribute. The authorityMonitor observes this change but ignores it because its view is current.

Certificate renewal

CA signing certificates will eventually expire, and therefore require renewal. Because the FreeIPA framework operates with low privileges, it cannot add a Certmonger tracking request for sub-CAs when it creates them. Furthermore, although the renewal (i.e. the actual signing of a new certificate for the CA) should only happen on one server, the certificate must be updated in the NSSDB of all Dogtag clones.

As mentioned earlier, the ipa-certupdate command has been enhanced to add Certmonger tracking requests for FreeIPA-managed lightweight CAs. The actual renewal will only be performed on whichever server is the renewal master when Certmonger decides it is time to renew the certificate (assuming that the tracking request has been added on that server).

Let’s run ipa-certupdate on the renewal master to add the tracking request for the new CA. First observe that the tracking request does not exist yet:

# getcert list -d /etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias |grep subject
        subject: CN=CA Audit,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
        subject: CN=OCSP Subsystem,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
        subject: CN=CA Subsystem,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
        subject: CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
        subject: CN=f24b-0.ipa.local,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330

As expected, we do not see our sub-CA certificate above. After running ipa-certupdate the following tracking request appears:

Request ID '20160725222909':
        status: MONITORING
        stuck: no
        key pair storage: type=NSSDB,location='/etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias',nickname='caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd',token='NSS Certificate DB',pin set
        certificate: type=NSSDB,location='/etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias',nickname='caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd',token='NSS Certificate DB'
        CA: dogtag-ipa-ca-renew-agent
        issuer: CN=Certificate Authority,O=IPA.LOCAL 201606201330
        subject: CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL
        expires: 2036-07-15 05:46:00 UTC
        key usage: digitalSignature,nonRepudiation,keyCertSign,cRLSign
        pre-save command: /usr/libexec/ipa/certmonger/stop_pkicad
        post-save command: /usr/libexec/ipa/certmonger/renew_ca_cert "caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd"
        track: yes
        auto-renew: yes

As for updating the certificate in each clone’s NSSDB, Dogtag itself takes care of that. All that is required is for the renewal master to update the CA’s authoritySerial attribute in the Dogtag database. The renew_ca_cert Certmonger post-renewal hook script performs this step. Each Dogtag clone observes the update (in the monitor thread), looks up the certificate with the indicated serial number in its certificate repository (a new entry that will also have been recently replicated to the clone), and adds that certificate to its NSSDB. Again, let’s observe this process by forcing a certificate renewal:

# getcert resubmit -i 20160725222909
Resubmitting "20160725222909" to "dogtag-ipa-ca-renew-agent".

After about 30 seconds the renewal process is complete. When we examine the certificate in the NSSDB we see, as expected, a new serial number:

# certutil -d /etc/pki/pki-tomcat/alias -L \
    -n "caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd" \
    | grep -i serial
        Serial Number: 74 (0x4a)

We also see that the renew_ca_cert script has updated the serial in Dogtag’s database:

# ldapsearch -D cn="Directory Manager" -w4me2Test -b o=ipaca \
    '(cn=660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd)' authoritySerial
dn: cn=660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd,ou=authorities,ou=ca,o=ipaca
authoritySerial: 74

Finally, if we look at the CA debug log on the clone, we’ll see that the the authority monitor observes the serial number change and updates the certificate in its own NSSDB (again, some irrelevant or low-information messages have been omitted):

[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: Processed change controls.
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: authorityMonitor: MODIFY
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: new entryUSN = 1832
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: readAuthority: known entryUSN = 361
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: CertificateAuthority init 
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: ca.signing Signing Unit nickname caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got token Internal Key Storage Token by name
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Found cert by nickname: 'caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd' with serial number: 63
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got private key from cert
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got public key from cert
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: CA signing unit inited
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: in init - got CA name CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Updating certificate in NSSDB; new serial number: 74

When the authority monitor processes the change, it reinitialises the CA including its signing unit. Then it observes that the serial number of the certificate in its NSSDB differs from the serial number from LDAP. It pulls the certificate with the new serial number from its certificate repository, imports it into NSSDB, then reinitialises the signing unit once more and sees the correct serial number:

[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: ca.signing Signing Unit nickname caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got token Internal Key Storage Token by name
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Found cert by nickname: 'caSigningCert cert-pki-ca 660ad30b-7be4-4909-aa2c-2c7d874c84fd' with serial number: 74
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got private key from cert
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: Got public key from cert
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: CA signing unit inited
[26/Jul/2016:10:43:28][authorityMonitor]: in init - got CA name CN=Smart Card CA,O=IPA.LOCAL

Currently this update mechanism is only used for lightweight CAs, but it would work just as well for the main CA too, and we plan to switch at some stage so that the process is consistent for all CAs.

Wrapping up

I hope you have enjoyed this tour of some of the lightweight CA internals, and in particular seeing how the design actually plays out on your systems in the real world.

FreeIPA lightweight CAs has been the most complex and challenging project I have ever undertaken. It took the best part of a year from early design and proof of concept, to implementing the Dogtag lightweight CAs feature, then FreeIPA integration, and numerous bug fixes, refinements or outright redesigns along the way. Although there are still some rough edges, some important missing features and, I expect, many an RFE to come, I am pleased with what has been delivered and the overall design.

Thanks are due to all of my colleagues who contributed to the design and review of the feature; each bit of input from all of you has been valuable. I especially thank Ade Lee and Endi Dewata from the Dogtag team for their help with API design and many code reviews over a long period of time, and from the FreeIPA team Jan Cholasta and Martin Babinsky for a their invaluable input into the design, and much code review and testing. I could not have delivered this feature without your help; thank you for your collaboration!

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